Victorian Bushfire Black Saturday Essay

Essay on Bushfires - 1150 Words - StudyMode

A few weeks into Term Four Mrs Attree came into the class and told us that we would be studying still images. She showed us some photos and one was of Sam (the koala) from the Victorian bushfires. Most of us sighed when we saw the picture. We felt sad as we thought about the poor animals that suffered. When we started asking Mrs Attree questions, we couldn’t stop. We really wanted to know how serious the fires were and what happened. Mrs Attree showed us more images from the bushfires as well as clips and news footage. We were all interested and stunned by what we were seeing. It was sad and heartbreaking to realise what people had gone through. We then looked at a website (‘The Professional Hobo’), where a lady had recorded what was happening as the fires were burning. We began writing a whole class essay to send to Nora. By having us write together, to create one document, we are hoping that it symbolises how the communities affected by the fires came together. -(Chevie)

Professor Tom Griffiths, whose essay ‘We have still not lived long enough’ won the Alfred Deakin Prize for an Essay Advancing Public Debate at the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards, said he will donate the $15,000 prize money to a research project that’s helping communities recovering from the Black Saturday bushfires in Victoria to record their stories.

A few weeks into Term Four Mrs Attree came into the class and told us that we would be studying still images. She showed us some photos and one was of Sam (the koala) from the Victorian bushfires. Most of us sighed when we saw the picture. We felt sad as we thought about the poor animals that suffered. When we started asking Mrs Attree questions, we couldn’t stop. We really wanted to know how serious the fires were and what happened. Mrs Attree showed us more images from the bushfires as well as clips and news footage. We were all interested and stunned by what we were seeing. It was sad and heartbreaking to realise what people had gone through. We then looked at a website (‘The Professional Hobo’), where a lady had recorded what was happening as the fires were burning. We began writing a whole class essay to send to Nora. By having us write together, to create one document, we are hoping that it symbolises how the communities affected by the fires came together. -(Chevie)

A year nine class in WA collectively wrote an essay of their reflections on the 2009 Victorian Bushfires. They asked me to read it, and I agreed to publish it.

Your task is to investigate the role that scientists have played in the understanding of bushfire behaviour and their effect on the Australian landscape, both today and in the past. Is bushfire a necessary part of the Asutralian ecology? Are bushfires something that we as Australians just have to live with? Are all bushfires the same? What technologies are being used to monitor bushfires? Why is south-eastern Australia so vulnerable to bushfires? Why do they most often occur at the beginning of summer?

Black Saturday Bushfires Essay Sample - Bla Bla Writing

Australia is frequently ravaged by bushfires, more so than any other country in the world. During the severe 2002-2003 season, which lasted from 1 July 2002 to 28 February 2003, there were 5999 bushfires recorded. There has been a long, dramatic history of bushfires on the continent, with fires first sparking around five million years ago when dry grassland began to dominate the landscape. Prior to this period, Australia was predominately composed of lakes, wetlands, rivers and rainforests, conditions far too wet to foster bushfires. Around 40 000 years ago bushfires began to occur more regularly. The early Aboriginal peoples had an intricate understanding of fire and valued its relationship to the land. Today, bushfires wreak havoc across the land, causing significant amounts of damage, destroying buildings and houses, harming livestock, and on occasion, killing humans. See image 1 What is a bushfire?

An essay on bushfires as natural hazards - WriteWork

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Photo by Nathan Maddock, Bushfire CRC
There were many, many highlights throughout the day. I know that a particular highlight for John, for example, was hearing the words “the revolution has begun” spoken confidently and meaningfully by a senior Victorian State government policy maker, Mark Duckworth. Mark was responding to a passionate call made by community activist Kate Lawrence, who asked us to consider the systemic change needed to reinvigorate civil society in Australia today. Along a similar line, for me one of the many highlights was seeing mild and pleased amazement on people’s faces as they talked about hearing a range of people who work in government talk tangibly about significantly new ways of thinking and working in a way that was both thoughtful and thought-provoking. Many of the panellists in the workshop were tackling the same critical question, albeit in a range of different ways: What should the role of government be in our society, particularly with respect to managing risks, supporting community resilience and strengthening the systems that underpin this resilience?

A bushfire is a firre burning out of control inthe open

This essay and the questions it presented set in train events leading to the founding of the Victorian Bushfire Project. This collaboration between the Centre for Environmental History and the residents of Steels Creek, Victoria, seeks to address the gap in understanding of the social, cultural and ecological dimensions of fire experience.


Rather than write an essay about a collection of random images, we adopted the ‘Victorian Bushfires’ as our theme and began to look for more images. That was when I came across the website, ‘The Professional Hobo’—that contained an amazing blow-by-blow account of living through the Victorian fires. Again, my students were captivated.Rather than write an essay about a collection of random images, we adopted the ‘Victorian Bushfires’ as our theme and began to look for more images. That was when I came across the website, ‘The Professional Hobo’—that contained an amazing blow-by-blow account of living through the Victorian fires. Again, my students were captivated.The essay is an analysis of the Victorian bushfires and the deep ecological and historical patterns that gave rise to the event. It was originally published in Inside Story in February.